What is a Nakiri Knife?

WHAT IS THE ORIGIN OF THE NAKIRI KNIFE?

A Nakiri knife, when translated, literally means "vegetable chopper." "Na" means "vegetable" and "Kiri" means chopper.

The Nakiri knife is also very close to the Usuba knife which is also used as a vegetable slicer however unlike the Usuba, the Nakiri is double beveled (i.e. sharpened on both sides). The Nakiri is therefore more popular for vegetable consumers especially in Europe and the Americas

Both the Nakiri and Usuba knives have been around a long time in Japan. Throughout the Edo era, from early 1600's to late 1860's it was illegal to consume a four legged animal. As a result the predominant diet was built around fish, rice and vegetables. Japanese people continue to eat more fish than Europeans or Americans and so the Nakiri knife remains one of the most popular knives in Japan.

USE AND SPECS OF A NAKIRI KNIFE

The Nakiri knife has a deep belly on the knife with a predominantly straight edge crafted for chopping rather than rocking. The side on the knife looks a bit like a meat cleaver however the Nakiri is lighter and has a slimmer blade, allowing it to cut through onions, tomatoes, carrots and other vegetables quicker and safer.

The length of the blade on Lamson's Nakiri is 7"

The main difference when using a Nakiri knife as opposed to a Chef's knife or even a Santoku is that the Nakiri is built for chopping with an up and down motion.

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